Watch Hurricane Florence Make Landfall in This Incredible Space Station Video

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Hurricane Florence made landfall near Wrightsville Beach, N.C., at 7:15 a.m. ET, creeping slowly ashore - but bringing strong winds, a massive storm surge and a rain system that will soak much of the state and SC for days. The child's injured father was taken to a hospital. Local media said the woman had suffered a heart attack.

Hurricane Florence smashed into the Carolinas yesterday, pounding coastal areas with high winds, a surge of sea water and torrential rain. Some 3,000 people died in the aftermath of that storm.

The NHC described Florence as a "slow mover" and said it had the potential to dump historic amounts of rain on North and SC, as much as one metre in some places.

Surges and flooding will reportedly continue as it lashes SC.

A tornado watch was issued for eastern North Carolina.

Shaken after seeing waves crashing in the Neuse River just outside his house in the town of New Bern, hurricane veteran Tom Ballance wished he had evacuated.

The hurricane was "wreaking havoc" and could wipe out entire communities as it makes its "violent grind across our state for days", the governor said.

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As Hurricane Florence passes through Hampton Roads, many are wondering what to do with the extra perishable supplies they accumulated in preparation for the storm.

Downed trees, branches on the hurricane-lashed streets of Wilmington, North Carolina.

Firefighters pray at an operation to remove a tree that fell on a house injuring resident during Hurricane Florence in Wilmington, North Carolina on September 14, 2018.

A fourth person reportedly was killed while plugging in a generator in the state's Lenoir County, according to USA media.

Along the coast, floodwaters have been hitting inland towns near rivers that normally discharge into the ocean.

The downtown area of the city of 30,000 people was underwater and around 150 people were waiting to be rescued, city authorities said on Twitter.

Forecasters say "it can not be emphasized enough that the most serious hazard associated with slow-moving Florence is extremely heavy rainfall, which will cause disastrous flooding that will be spreading inland".

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The National Hurricane Center says that "catastrophic" freshwater flooding is expected over portions of the Carolinas as Hurricane Florence inches closer to the U.S. East Coast.

Parts of North and SC were forecast to get as much as 40 inches of rain (1 meter).

The National Hurricane Center said Florence will eventually make a right hook to the northeast over the southern Appalachians, moving into the Mid-Atlantic states and New England as a tropical depression by the middle of next week.

For more on Hurricane Florence, visit the FOX 46 Resource Center.

"The fact is this storm is deadly and we know we are days away from an ending", Cooper said.

About 10 million people could be affected by the storm and more than 1 million were ordered to evacuate the coasts of the Carolinas and Virginia.

These types of slow-moving storms - like Hurricane Harvey - can be particularly unsafe because of the rain and flooding they can bring.

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Early on Friday, South Carolina emergency officials said there was still time, "but not a lot of time" for people to leave flood-prone areas.

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